Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat-Decreased Desire, Sexual Side Effects of Menopause | The North American Menopause Society, NAMS

How to Navigate This Online Resource. Changes at Midlife. Causes of Sexual Problems. Effective Treatments for Sexual Problems. Frequently Asked Questions.

Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat

Member Log In. While they are typically recommended to prevent incontinence, they can also help your orgasms be stronger. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Desire usually but not always wanes with age. Menopause 10 Symptoms of Menopause and Perimenopause. Causes Dcreased Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat desire are complex. Petersburg clinics. Menopause Treatments for Menopausal and Perimenopausal Symptoms Need relief from midlife mood swings, hot flashes, and sleep trouble?

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Sex after the menopause. It has also been known to treat insomnia, another obstacle of a low libido, as well as other menopausal symptoms, like hot flashes. Is everything okay? What is sexual Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat John's wort is effective to treat symptoms of depression and improve overall outlook on life. Think about sex The brain is an important sexual organ, and thinking menopasue sex increases sexual desire. What causes sexual dysfunction? Causes of decreased desire are complex. Frequently Asked Questions. Women in midlife: Psychological issues.

Menopause can be liberating — no more worries about pregnancy or dealing with your monthly period.

  • However, for some women low desire becomes a concern.
  • Menopause can be liberating — no more worries about pregnancy or dealing with your monthly period.
  • For women, libido is often multifaceted, with desires rooted in both physical and emotional sources.

Would you rather watch TV than tear up the sheets with your honey? So why are you spending Saturday night binge-watching? Chalk it up to menopause. For many women, a low libido is just one more irritating byproduct of aging. But as women age, physical changes play a role too.

In fact, having an active sex life after menopause is still possible — with a little work, patience and experimentation, Barnard says. Read on to learn how… What is the difference between libido or sex drive, and arousal? Sex drive is the colloquial term for libido. Arousal is the [physical] process — the stimulation to the body — that begins after you notice a desire for sex.

Do women in menopause generally have more trouble with low libido or arousal? Women have sexual pain or trouble achieving orgasm due to the aging process. Slow or low arousal is the most common change that postmenopausal women experience. Many women I talk to who complain about low libido are interested in sex, but they become frustrated when it takes a long time to get aroused or have an orgasm.

So they stop responding to their interest because it's just not worth it. Alleviating pain seems like the first step. What do you recommend for that?

To help with pain caused by dry, thinning skin, start by using a water-based vaginal moisturizer. Gently rub the lubricant into the vulva and inside the vagina as far as you can reach. The silicone lubricant will seal the surface of your skin and make it slippery, while the water-based lubricant adds moisture to your skin.

You may find that you prefer one type of lubricant for sex, and another for daily moisturizing. Smooth it on any time during the day when you feel dry. You can also insert it into your vagina with a dropper at bedtime to moisturize your vaginal tissues all night long.

Besides, daily moisturizing, we recommend massaging your vulva daily, both manually and with vibration. This helps the skin become more flexible, with better blood flow and thicker, more resilient tissue underneath. We call these three steps the Vaginal Renewal Program. Once pain is managed, how can you boost a low libido? Start an active practice of thinking about sex. Set an alarm on your phone for three to five times a day. When the first one goes off, think about the last time you had good sex.

The next time, think about a great fantasy. Then the next time, think of a scene out of a movie that turned you on. Spontaneous, body-instigated lust happens only when we fall in love. But you can create a great deal of eroticism if you choose it and make it a priority. The more good sex you have, the more you want it.

Have your partner learn to point out the small, first signs of arousal. You also need to schedule sex, just like you did when you were new parents — only now the oven takes longer to preheat, so you need to schedule more time.

You recommend that women be adventurous to improve sex after menopause. What do you suggest? Everyone is different, but I find that little adventures work best: Going without underwear to a fancy dinner, someplace where the tables have long tablecloths and enjoying a little semi-public sex play.

Or just going without panties and slipping a note to your partner that you have done so! A great book called Grrreat Nights of Sex by Laura Corn gives you suggestions, half for her and half for him to arrange. So you don't have to come up with your own ideas if you are stuck. Can food such as oysters be an aphrodisiac? No food has been proven to increase libido. But a diet high in antioxidant-rich foods helps by increasing your circulation, opening up blood vessels and making you strong and flexible.

If you and your partner are connected, go ahead and start playing because the likelihood is you will have fun. Do you recommend vibrators to help improve a low libido? Vibrators are great. They offer the long-lasting stimulation our bodies need. You could do it, but do you really want to do that now?

No, you have an electric mixer. What is a pump? This is a small, hand-held vacuum system, in which a plastic cup fits over the clitoris to stimulate blood flow and help increase arousal. There are less expensive pumps, but many women find them intrusive. Can these help with orgasms? Yes, these exercises help strengthen and increase flexibility of the pelvic floor. While they are typically recommended to prevent incontinence, they can also help your orgasms be stronger.

To properly do Kegel exercises, locate the muscle by inserting a finger into your vagina and squeeze around it. Hold the squeeze for 10 seconds and then fully relax for 10 seconds. Kegel exercises don't actually tighten the vagina, but they tone and strengthen vaginal muscles, which can increase arousal.

They also cause a tighter grip during intercourse and more intense contractions during orgasm because it increases blood to the vagina. Any final suggestions? Most of the ways you make sex better is by having a really healthy body and working with your own mind.

Become playful and willing to experiment. Everyday Health Women's Health Menopause. Sign up for our Women's Health Newsletter! Thanks for signing up for our newsletter! You should see it in your inbox very soon. Please enter a valid email address Subscribe We respect your privacy. Menopause Hot Flash Treatment in Development May Be a Game Changer A novel, nonhormonal medication targeting menopausal vasomotor symptoms may add treatment options for women, research suggests.

Menopause Treatments for Menopausal and Perimenopausal Symptoms Need relief from midlife mood swings, hot flashes, and sleep trouble? Learn about how to treat, manage, and cope with menopausal symptoms. Menopause Menopause and Perimenopause Resource Center. Menopause 10 Symptoms of Menopause and Perimenopause.

Menopause Mindfulness May Help Improve Menopause Symptoms New research finds that being in the moment helps ease symptoms such as hot flashes and the stress menopause can cause. Menopause Later Menopause Linked to Better Memory, Study Shows Women who enter menopause at a later age have slightly better recall than women going through this change earlier, a new British study has found. Menopause Timing of Menopause May Affect Heart Failure Risk Women whose periods end early and those who never give birth seem at added risk, research suggests.

Consider how your sexual function influences her sexual experience. There are many things that affect libido including hormones, aging, life circumstances, psychological problems and physiological problems. Of Interest This Week. Biological factors Be healthy and encourage her to be healthy Physical health influences sexual function, and staying healthy is an important part of having a great post-menopause sex life. Increased blood flow will allow for heightened sensitivity and easier orgasm.

Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat

Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat

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Changes at Midlife. Causes of Sexual Problems. Effective Treatments for Sexual Problems. Frequently Asked Questions. Give Us YourFeedback. The clitoris is likely to be less sensitive than in earlier years, possibly due to reduced estrogen levels and changes in the vascular and nervous systems. Here again, the vaginal atrophy and dryness related to low estrogen play a role, as does reduced blood supply to the clitoris and lower vagina. Also, the clitoris—a key center of sexual pleasure for most women—is likely to be less sensitive than in earlier years, possibly due to reduced estrogen levels and changes in the vascular and nervous systems.

All of this may mean some reduction in the sensations and pleasure you experience during lovemaking. It also can affect orgasm, which may be less intense, take longer to achieve, or rarely happen at all. You may or may not be a candidate for HRT. Natural Menopause Relief — studies have shown benefits in the use of herbs for menopause.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy — research shows that testosterone plays a part in the female sex drive. You will need to speak with your Healthcare Professional about what testosterone treatment might be available to you and to discuss the side effects.

Remember that your partner will also be going through changes as part of the aging process. Older men sometimes need stimulation to attain an erection and have a longer refractory period. Most importantly is the necessity to maintain open communication with your partner and the need to work together to find a solution. Sometimes healthcare professionals will refer you to a therapist experienced in low sexual desire.

Studd, J. Annual Review Loss of Libido and Menopause. The Management of Menopause. Partenon Publishing. Decreased Desire. Sex after the menopause. Reddish, S. May Loss of Libido in menopausal women. Management issues. Disclaimer: The information and resources on this site are not intended to supplement or substitute for the expertise and judgement of your healthcare professional.

Adverts on this website are not endorsed by MHM. Loss of libido is one of the most common symptoms of menopause. Risk factors that make it more likely that you will encounter a lack of sexual desire include: Experiencing symptoms of perimenopause Are postmenopausal or have undergone surgical menopause Are experiencing relationship fatigue Your Hormones During Perimenopause A decline in the levels of 2 major hormones can be a factor in the decline of sexual drive and energy.

Testosterone Testosterone is the main hormone for sexual desire, so when the body begins to produce lower levels of this hormone it may cause lack of desire.

Maintaining Your Sex Drive During Menopause | Everyday Health

Menopause can be liberating — no more worries about pregnancy or dealing with your monthly period. However, the many physical changes you go through during this time can affect you emotionally and sink your sex drive.

Here's how you can adjust to the symptoms of menopause and enjoy sex again. Decreased estrogen levels during menopause can affect many aspects of sexual function, causing difficulty becoming aroused, vaginal dryness , and vaginal atrophy, or thinning and inflammation of the vaginal walls, which can affect as many as 45 percent of women after menopause. These changes can result in painful sex and decreased sensitivity, explains Sheryl A.

Vaginal atrophy in particular can cause significant problems when it comes to sex drive and intimacy. A large North American study published in the journal Menopause in February found that painful sex related to vaginal atrophy negatively affected both men and women and was noted as the primary reason for decreased sex drive and avoiding sex.

Menopause can also cause hot flashes and night sweats, and as a result, many women experience trouble sleeping and simply feel too fatigued for sex.

Weight gain during menopause is common, and some women may be uncomfortable adjusting to their fuller figures. Others may feel depressed, irritable, or moody.

None of these symptoms sets the stage for sex, so desire can fizzle. If a woman is fatigued, the last thing on her mind is usually sex. The changes in your body and your sex life can cause problems in your relationship. There are many ways of addressing problems with sexual function, sex drive, and intimacy.

Here are some steps that can help:. Try treatment for vaginal atrophy: The dry, thinning inflammation of vaginal atrophy can be treated with a local estrogen treatment, such as a ring, cream, or tablet. In addition, women can use lubricants to make sex more comfortable. You can also talk to your doctor about medication to treat painful sex after menopause. Make sex a priority: During menopause, it's important to make sex a priority and be intimate on a regular basis.

However, make sure that your relationship is emotionally healthy before you try to tackle physical intimacy. Gass says. A marital or sex therapist can play an important role in current and future happiness. Work on improving communication with your partner and talk openly about the emotions you are experiencing, including fear, resentment, and avoiding sex, to help improve intimacy. Focus on intimacy, not just sex: If you enjoy being close to your partner in other ways besides having sex, that may actually boost your sex drive.

Libido is constantly changing for a woman — not only during menopause. Everyday Solutions. Night sweats, weight gain, moodiness, fatigue — how can you be in the mood for sex when you're dealing with symptoms of menopause? Your body may be changing, but you can still find ways to keep the spark alive. Why Sex Drive Wanes Decreased estrogen levels during menopause can affect many aspects of sexual function, causing difficulty becoming aroused, vaginal dryness , and vaginal atrophy, or thinning and inflammation of the vaginal walls, which can affect as many as 45 percent of women after menopause.

Here are some steps that can help: Try treatment for vaginal atrophy: The dry, thinning inflammation of vaginal atrophy can be treated with a local estrogen treatment, such as a ring, cream, or tablet.

Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat

Decreased sensitivity sex menopause treat